April Newsletter – Flea and Tick Season and a Guide to Your Aging Dog

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We’re stocking up on flea and tick products—most are available now.  (The discounted winter-wear will go away to make room for the warm-weather stuff.)  We will carry “chemical” and “natural” flea and tick products.  See our guide for further information on flea and tick control—make informed choices about what is best for your dog and your situation.

Consignment Corner Announcement

As we reach the end of the winter season, all who have winter jackets in our Consignment Corner are asked to take them back so we have room for other items.  Thank you!

Easter Holiday

The store will be closed on Easter Sunday, April 5.

New Products

  • Dog Gone Smart Ninja bed—toughest bed around—resists chewing and scratching
  • Cute double-bowl food/water sets
  • Beef scapula chews (a healthier alternative to pig ears—did you know that the ear is where hormone suppositories are injected in pigs? least healthy part of the pig)
  • Rawhide multi-packs
  • NaturVet SOD + Boswellia
  • NaturVet Calming Moments (with melatonin)

Your Aging Dog

olddogIn hopes of assisting your dog to age gracefully, here are some issues aging dogs experience, and ways you can address them.

First, let’s bust a couple myths:

  1. Don’t consider your dog a “senior” when he hits 7 years of age.  Dogs age at different rates.  There’s no magic number—there are just some age-related or age-exacerbated conditions that the odds of seeing go up after around 7 years of age (bigger dogs may experience them at younger ages, smaller dogs at older ages).
  2. You don’t need to change to a “senior” food when your dog gets older.  Dogs need more high-quality protein (rather than less) as they age, in order to maintain muscle mass.  High protein does not cause kidney disease or kidney failure.  (If your dog already has kidney disease, you should be concerned about protein levels.)  If you want to boost protein level of your current food, try adding goat’s milk (we have frozen or instant) or Ocean Cure (by Nature’s Farmacy).  Both are easily digestible.  Or try topping your dog’s kibble with a little freeze dried raw food (Stella & Chewy’s, Primal, Vital Essentials).

Arthritis

Is your aging dog slow to sit, lie down or stand up?  Does she limp?  Not jump up or down as much as he used to?  Has she developed slightly abnormal posture (a slight hunch in the back)?  React negatively to touching in certain places?  These are signs of pain and stiffness of osteoarthritis.  There are four things that can help:
  • Moderate exercise:  Walking or swimming (at a pace they can manage)
  • Therapies like low level laser, massage, chiropractic, and acupuncture (low level laser has helped my dogs)
  • Anti-inflammatories:  Check out our supplement aisle for fish oil, yucca, boswellia, or turmeric
  • Joint/cartilage reparatives:  Glucosamine/chondroitin, elk velvet antler, SAM-e, and green-lipped mussel are all supplements that can help—again, see our supplement aisle

Dementia (or “old-timers”)

olddog2If your dog appears to “zone out” from time to time, her mental acuity might be dimming a little bit.  I was noticing this in one of my dogs—I actually thought his hearing was gone.  Until I tried Animals’ Apawthecary Hawthorn Plus.  I noticed a difference in a couple days:  he could hear and respond to me, he was more involved in daily activities, and he initiated more interactions.

Here’s a You Tube video by someone whose dog had extreme dementia: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1K36YgR5j0Q  Also consider calming supplements to help your senior rest easier (the effects of aging can be troubling to them as well as to us).

Digestive Support
To help the senior dog’s body extract the maximum possible nutrition from the food it is eating, consider adding prebiotics, probiotics, and/or especially digestive enzymes (which tend to decrease in order dogs) to the food.
Detoxifying

A lifetime of exposure to the toxins of modern life (lawn chemicals, cleaning agents, road dirt, air pollution, etc.) can leave a body in need of “cleaning.”  Occasional use of these liver support supplements and “superfoods” can assist in a gentle way:

  • Burdock root
  • Milk thistle
  • Animals’ Apawthecary Detox Blend or Senior Blend
  • Missing Link
  • Kelp
  • Rejuv-a-Wafers (chlorella)
  • Solid Gold Seameal
  • Mercola Spirugreen (spirulina)

We also have supplements that support other issues your senior dog is dealing with (e.g., vision, heart).

Our dogs are more and more precious as they journey into their senior years.  There are lots of ways to help make that journey a smooth one.
By | 2017-05-18T11:14:35+00:00 April 1st, 2015|Newsletter|0 Comments

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